Archive for January 2014

    • Study criticizes CA’s tenure, dismissal laws

      (District of Columbia) In a stinging evaluation of policies and standards governing classroom educators in California, the National Council on Teacher Quality has put yet another spotlight on the state's teacher protection laws.

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    • Ensuring foster youth don’t lose out on partial credit

      (Calif.) Although California has long been a national leader in establishing the educational rights of foster youth on paper, promising results have remained elusive as about 60 percent of the foster student population continues to drop out early from high school. Now, new emphasis is being placed on the obscure process for measuring, awarding and accepting partial credits earned by foster youth between interruptions caused by the courts, school transfers or disruptive home life.

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    • Smaller class size is favored school reform method

      (Ind.) Smaller class size, followed by increased technology and greater accountability (such as shuttering failing schools) was perceived to be the most effective school reform strategy, according to a new survey released this month.

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    • Ag Ed supporters seek legislative funding fix

       (Calif.) Lawmakers will have to intervene – again – to save the state’s century-old agricultural education program after Gov. Jerry Brown has ignored appeals to fund it separately.

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    • New money for adult ed contemplated

      (Calif.) A key legislative panel is set this week to review the status of adult education in the state just a year after lawmakers rejected Gov. Jerry Brown’s plan to shift administration of the program to community colleges because too many K-12 school districts significantly reduced services during the recession.

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    • Poverty claims record number of children

      (District of Columbia) New research from the Children's Defense Fund shows one in five American children, or 16.1 million, were classified as poor in 2012. About half of them, some 7.1 million children, lived in extreme poverty, meaning a family of four existed on less than $12,000 per year.

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    • Mississippi simmering – still no wage boost for teachers

      (Miss.) The average teacher salary here is the second lowest in the nation and the Legislature has met its self-imposed funding benchmark just twice in 16 years. Advocates say enough is enough.

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    • Prop. 39 revenues disappoint after loophole closed

      (Calif.) Grand plans that closure of a corporate tax loophole would fund a broad array of energy projects for schools and spike the state’s general fund may be fizzling.

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    • Feds offer new resources on school climate, discipline

      (District of Columbia) In an effort to tamp down on excessive disciplinary actions meted out in K-12 schools, federal officials released earlier this month comprehensive guidance drawing from expertise of both the education community and law enforcement.

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    • New SIG cohort set to advance

      (Calif.) The first steps in qualifying a new group of California’s lowest performing schools for additional federal aid won passage last week from the state board of education.

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