Archive for February 2017

    • Schools receive guidance on interactions with ICE agents

      (Calif.) Following weeks of high profile arrests and deportations of undocumented immigrants, the California School Boards Association is reminding districts of their rights in dealing with immigration enforcement agents–notably, that school officials are not required to do so.

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    • Teacher salaries–a regional commodity

      (Alaska) Teacher shortages in some parts of the nation are driving school districts to offer better than average starting salaries and signing bonus. Meanwhile, schools in in other parts of the country where the economic recovery has been spotty continue to struggle with basic classroom needs.

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    • Community awareness needed for underserved groups

      The special education department has an obligation to inform the community about dynamic issues relevant to students with disabilities. Recent briefs from the U.S. Department of Education should serve as an impetus to fulfill this responsibility for three subpopulations that are often unrecognized.

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    • More realistic measures should score alternative schools

      (Calif.) Common indicators used to measure school performance at traditional schools do not accurately reflect progress made at alternative schools, according to a new study.

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    • Federal rule dispute is a key element in transgender case

      (District of Columbia)  On the surface, the suit pending before the U.S. Supreme Court over bathrooms and transgender students would seem to be a straight-forward conflict over civil rights. But some experts believe the case brings forward a far different argument over the limits of federal rulemaking.

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    • A mix of solutions needed to relieve teacher shortage

      (Calif.) Lawmakers were urged Wednesday to look at creative ways to support working conditions at schools as a means of attracting new recruits and of retaining veteran teachers in the profession.

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    • Do-over entrance exam project sends more students to college

      (Tenn.) A surge of students scored higher on college admission tests and became eligible for in-state scholarships following Tennessee’s first state-funded program giving high schoolers to retake the ACT exam.

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    • Surprise! Federal education law is pro-immigration

      Communities may worry about future prospects for educating immigrants, especially in light of the tone of some of the current rhetoric from our nation’s Capitol. However, the Every Student Succeeds Act strongly supports the achievement of every student–with a firm commitment to those coming from abroad.

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    • School management linked to teacher turnover

      (N.Y.) The high rate of teacher turnover in most schools serving low-income neighborhoods has generally been perceived as the result of the problems students from low-income families bring to class.

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    • Alternatives to retention for students with disabilities

      As students with poor academic skills move through the grades, their peers outperform them at a rate that is almost exponential. Since retention is rarely the best option, educators must be ready to employ other more suitable interventions.

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