Archive for April 2014

    • Study finds benefits of extra support for 5th graders

      Participation in a multi-year summer academy and after-school program led to better performance in math among at-risk fifth and sixth graders up to four years later, according to a new study vetted by the U.S. Department of Education.

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    • States taking steps to further goals in early education

      Maryland joined the growing list of states putting greater emphasis on early education when Gov. Martin O’Malley earlier this month signed a bill expanding the state’s preschool program.

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    • Push is on to beef up computer science in K-12

      (Calif.) On Monday, legislation that would allow an approved computer science course to count for high school mathematics credit passed out of the Assembly on a 74-0 vote. A second bill – AB  1530, which encourages the state’s public schools superintendent to develop model curriculum on computer science – was read for the second time and will be up for Assembly passage next.

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    • Common Core testing goes smoothly but expenses mount

      (Calif.) Despite a near-flawless rollout of a new, computerized student testing system aligned with the Common Core, school officials are still hoping a revenue boost for transition costs will be forthcoming when Gov. Jerry Brown releases his updated budget plan next month.

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    • Despite voter ban, state guide embraces bilingual ed

      (Calif.) Updated guidance from the state on how to teach California’s estimated 1.3 million English learners relies heavily on a strategy largely prohibited by voters 16 years ago – bilingual education.

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    • Schools’ English-only mandate set to resurface

      (Calif.) A much-anticipated bill aimed at repealing the state’s controversial ban on most bilingual education in K-12 schools faces its first legislative test next week, as supporters seek to reshape the debate from one that generates ethnic divide to a question of global competitiveness.

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    • New study demystifies learning styles

      Over one decade into the 21st century, more than a century and a half since the birth of Pavlov, a group of theorists has constructed a cognitive framework that is both well-founded and useable.

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    • Social media student data bill gets the go-ahead

      (Calif.) A bill that would impose restrictions on how school districts handle information gathered from students' social media accounts moved with bipartisan support out of the Assembly Education Committee Wednesday afternoon.

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    • National Health Institutes want input on Asperger revision

      (District of Columbia) After investing nearly $200 million of public money in research and treatment services related to autism spectrum disorders, the National Institutes of Health is calling for input from health professionals and the scientific community about the implications of new definitions of autism.

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    • Lawmakers reject Brown’s online learning proposal

      (Calif.) A key budget panel on Tuesday rejected Gov. Jerry Brown’s latest plan to give the K-12 independent study program a makeover and create more opportunities for students to use modern technology as part of their academic day.

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