Archive for April 2015

    • High schools to provide more online course options

      (Ala.) Every high school in Alabama may be required to offer virtual education options for students beginning in 2016-17 under a bill pending before Gov. Robert Bentley.

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    • $50m in anti-truancy funding likely

      (Calif.) Programs aimed at keeping kids in school and out of the so-called “prison pipeline” would receive a big boost under a bill being carried by the chair of the Senate Education Committee that lays groundwork for the use of  millions of dollars in prisoner-release savings.

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    • Standards for federal cost allowance

      Failing to follow regulatory allowances in expenditures for federal programs can readily result in non-complaint findings, embarrassment, and financial penalties. It is always best to be conservative, when interpreting the regulations.

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    • Delay coming to science frameworks

      Story updated May 5, 2015, at 12 p.m.

      (Calif.) SB 652, scheduled to be considered today by a key legislative panel, changes the date by which the California State Board of Education must adopt a new framework based on the Next Generation Science Standards – from Jan. 31, 2016, to Jan. 31, 2017.

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    • Training principals how to evaluate teachers

      (Tenn.) A report out this month marking the results of the first three years of a new program that trains principals to better evaluate teachers using classroom observation found 100,000 additional students were on grade level in math in 2014 as compared to 2010; and 57,000 more were on grade level in science.

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    • Attendance rates set to become federal benchmark

      (Calif.) Already a key reporting requirement of the state’s new accountability system, attendance rates would now also become one of three measures used by federal officials to gauge school performance in California.

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    • Full-day kindergarten coming to Oregon

      (Ore.) Advocates nationally for full-day kindergarten are cheering a new, $7.3 billion state budget in Oregon that includes money for the expanded early learning program.

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    • Assessing ethnic disproportionality

      While disproportionality may apply to multiple circumstances, ethnic disparity is consistently monitored by the U.S. Department of Education along with state agencies. Program managers should be  familiar with the regulatory measures.

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    • Tending to parent needs when it comes to sex ed

      (N.C.) Deciding how much information is needed to properly prepare pre-teens for parenthood has been an age-old challenge – it’s a dilemma school officials have been challenged with for decades.

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    • Poll hints of political train wreck over Common Core

      (Calif.) If it was big news last week that most parents know nothing about new K-12 testing aligned to the Common Core, consider the headlines later this summer when the results come back and only a fraction of the students pass.

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