Archive for June 2016

    • What to do with all that pesky testing data? Evaluate!

      The results of the spring standardized assessments — arriving at schools and district offices now or very soon — provide valuable data for evaluations to determine whether to continue, modify or discontinue programs

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    • Schools prompted to fix web access for disabled

      (District of Columbia) The U.S. Department of Education announced on Wednesday the settlement of various claims made against 11 education organizations for failing to provide adequate access to people with disabilities to their websites.

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    • Budget adds $200 million for college readiness

      (Calif.) Although the 2016-17 budget signed by Gov. Jerry Brown on Monday doesn’t contain any surprises for schools, it does include $200 million in new funding for college readiness that perhaps hasn’t received a lot of attention.

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    • UDL tips for general ed teachers – Part I

      Universal Design for Learning and inclusive practices are repeatedly emphasized throughout the Every Student Succeeds Act. Effective implementation, then, will require that instructors revise common assumptions about the way students learn.

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    • Teacher prep programs largely overlook needs of preschoolers

      (District of Columbia) Each year, thousands of preschool students get suspended for throwing temper tantrums or disrupting class, but few teachers charged with early learners are actually trained to handle misbehavior, according to new research.

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    • Building job-based learning bridges with schools

      (Calif.) After making significant progress in establishing worked-based and linked learning programs, California schools have struggled to find enough employers willing to provide all the job-shadowing and apprenticeship experiences the student demand calls for.

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    • Schools to prepare for the worst as cyberattacks increase

      (S.C.) Panic set in after a third school called its district office to report that staff couldn’t access  email, online digital content, assessment tools or network and cloud-based storage. The decision was made to shut down the district’s 600 servers in an attempt to stop the spread of malware spreading through 52 schools, but it was too late.

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    • States given flexibility to start ‘orderly transition’ to ESSA

      The U.S. Department of Education continues to issue advisories stressing that certain facets of No Child Left Behind will temporarily remain in effect as schools realign based on the Every Student Succeeds Act. 

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    • Appeals court: Parents’ rights trumps agency authority

      (Calif.) In a ruling with implications for how disputes over special education services are resolved, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals confirmed a parent’s right to a due process hearing regardless of potentially conflicting state laws.

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    • Reducing exclusionary practices in discipline

      The notice of proposed rulemaking pertaining to disproportionality in special education recently published in the Federal Register is notable for many reasons, but especially for its renewed emphasis on discipline. 

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