Archive for June 2017

    • Preparing for the looming shortage of educated workers

      (Calif.) To close a shortage of more than 1 million college-educated workers by 2030, California taxpayers will need to invest a lot more money expanding the capacity of traditional brick-and-mortar campuses, according to a new report from the Public Policy Institute of California.

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    • Training library staff for today and tomorrow

      (District of Columbia) A handful of school districts spread across the country will pilot a new micro-credentialing program next year aimed at  upgrading librarian teaching skills to reflect today’s digital education demands.

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    • Panel trims the list of ed. bills moving forward

      (Calif.) Bills seeking to make suspension policies more transparent, to streamline credentialing for military spouses and, to expand parental notification requirements for student English language proficiency have all likely failed to advance in action Monday before the Senate Education Committee.

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    • Early learning needs attract bipartisan support

      (District of Columbia) A new poll shows broad bipartisan support for increased funding of early learning programs including child care and preschool.

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    • Beach reading for special educators

      Even the most dedicated administrators manage to take a little time in July, and while indulging in leisure you’ll most likely consume a book or two during the spacious summer afternoons. Today’s column will provide recommendations for vacation reading.

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    • Smarter Balanced comes up short on interim exams

      (Calif.) Even as schools reached a milestone this month in transitioning to new statewide assessments, concerns over the testing program’s inability to provide useable feedback from interim exams has provoked legislative intervention.

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    • Classrooms: the next frontier in tackling opioid addiction

      (Md.) Maryland schools will begin regular lessons about the dangers of opioids as early as the third grade, under a set of bills set to go into effect on July 1.

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    • Civil rights notifications as important as ever

      The Trump administration has not been particularly vigorous about ensuring civil rights in education with regard to gender, race, disabilities, or cultural background but the protective measures required by law are as important as ever and they begin with sound policies and annual notifications. The summer season provides a lull in the daily demands on your office so you can spend time making sure that your information and procedures fully conform to the intent of the regulations.

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    • Bills target human trafficking and preschool suspensions

      (Calif.) A legislative panel moved one step closer to requiring teachers and students learn how to spot the signs of child sex trafficking, in action at the Capitol Wednesday

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    • Online learning for SWD: not an easy option for parents

      (Kan.) Parents of children with disabilities often turn to online learning when the rigors of a traditional classroom become too challenging.

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